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The Intrinsic Laws of Society

  Indeed the similarities between the Old Testament and the Buddhist main teachings bear witness to the power of truth: Right is and always will be right!

Seven Laws of Noah

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The Rainbow is the modern symbol of the Noahide Movement, recalling the rainbow that appeared after the Great Flood of the Bible.

The Seven Laws of Noah (Hebrew: שבע מצוות בני נחSheva mitzvot B'nei Noach), often referred to as the Noahide Laws, are a set of seven moral imperatives that, according to the Talmud, were given by God to Noah as a binding set of laws for all mankind.[1] According to Judaism any non-Jew who lives according to these laws is regarded as a Righteous Gentile and is assured of a place in the world to come (Olam Haba), the Jewish concept of heaven.[2] Adherents are often called "B'nei Noach" (Children of Noah) or "Noahides" and may often network in Jewish synagogues.

The seven laws listed by the Tosefta and the Talmud are[3]

  1. Prohibition of Idolatry: You shall not have any idols before God.
  2. Prohibition of Murder: You shall not murder. (Genesis 9:6)
  3. Prohibition of Theft: You shall not steal.
  4. Prohibition of Sexual Promiscuity: You shall not commit any of a series of sexual prohibitions, which include adultery, incest, bestiality and male homosexual intercourse.
  5. Prohibition of Blasphemy: You shall not blaspheme God's name.
  6. Dietary Law: Do not eat flesh taken from an animal while it is still alive. (Genesis 9:4)
  7. Requirement to have just Laws: You shall set up an effective judiciary to enforce the preceding six laws fairly.

The Noahide Laws were predated by six laws given to Adam in the Garden of Eden.[4] Later at the Revelation at Sinai the Seven Laws of Noah were regiven to humanity and embedded in the 613 Laws given to the Children of Israel along with the Ten Commandments, which are part of, and not separate from, the 613 mitzvot. These laws are mentioned in the Torah. According to Judaism, the 613 mitzvot or "commandments" given in the written Torah, as well as their reasonings in the oral Torah, were only issued to the Jews and are therefore binding only upon them, having inherited the obligation from their ancestors. At the same time, at Mount Sinai, the Children of Israel (i.e. the Children of Jacob, i.e. the Israelites) were given the obligation to teach other nations the embedded Noahide Laws. It is actually forbidden by the Talmud for non-Jews on whom the Noahide Laws are still binding, to elevate their observance to the Torah's mitzvot as the Jews do.[5]

Background

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According to Judaism, as expressed in the Talmud, the Noahide Laws apply to all humanity through mankind's descent from one paternal ancestor who in Hebrew tradition is called Noah (the head of the only family to survive during The Flood). In Judaism, בני נח B'nei Noah (Hebrew, "Descendants of Noah", "Children of Noah") refers to all of mankind.[citation needed][6]

The Talmud also states: "Righteous people of all nations have a share in the world to come" (Sanhedrin 105a). Any non-Jew who lives according to these laws is regarded as one of "the righteous among the gentiles". Maimonides writes that this refers to those who have acquired knowledge of God and act in accordance with the Noahide laws out of obedience to Him. According to what scholars consider to be the most accurate texts of the Mishneh Torah, Maimonides continues on to say that anyone who upholds the Noahide laws only because they appear logical is not one of the "righteous among the nations," but rather he is one of the wise among them. The more prolific versions of the Mishneh Torah say of such a person: "..nor is he one of the wise among them."[7]


 


 

Five Precepts

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Five precepts)
Jump to: navigation, search
Translations of

pañcasīlāni

English: five precepts,
five virtues
Pali: pañcasīlāni
Sanskrit: pañcaśīlāni
Sinhala: පන්සිල්
Burmese: ပဉ်စသီလ or
ငါးပါးသီလ

(pyì̃sa̰ θìla̰ pyinsa. thila. or
ŋá bá θìla̰ nga: ba: thila.
)
Chinese: 五戒
(Cantonese Jyutping: ng5 gaai3)

(pinyinwǔjiè)
Japanese: 五戒
(rōmaji: go kai)
Thai: ศีลห้า
Buddhism Glossary

The Five Precepts (Pali: pañca-sīla; Sanskrit: pañca-śīla)[1] constitute the basic iBuddhist code of ethics, undertaken by lay followers of the Buddha Gautama in the Theravada and Mahayana traditions. The Five Precepts are commitments to abstain from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and intoxication. Undertaking the five precepts is part of both lay Buddhist initiation and regular lay Buddhist devotional practices.

They are not formulated as imperatives, but as training rules that laypeople undertake voluntarily to facilitate practice.[2]

 

[edit] Pali texts

Pali literature provides the scriptures and commentary for traditional Theravadin practice.


[edit] Pali training rules

The following are the five precepts (pañca-sikkhāpada)[3] or five virtues (pañca-sīla) rendered in English and Pali:

1. I undertake the training rule to abstain from taking life. ātipātā veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.
2. I undertake the training rule to abstain from taking what is not given. Adinnādānā veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.
3. I undertake the training rule to abstain from sexual misconduct today. Kāmesu micchācāra veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.
4. I undertake the training rule to abstain from false speech. Musāvāda veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.
5. I undertake the training rule to abstain from drinks [and drugs] that cause heedlessness.[4] Surā-meraya-majja-pamādaṭṭhānā veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.[5]




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