Lasith (lasith) wrote,
Lasith
lasith

For Pferd

Pferd

Pferd runs freely, sometimes only in the mind
Across the fields of imagination
With words intricate yet descriptive
Luminescent reminiscent of past dreams

Integrity in those past dreams
Causes the search for redemption
Dreams that never lie dormant in the heart
Pferd calls us to run freely, content

Never in pasture, or grazing on the past
But living with the hope, the root of all dreams
The future bright and shining, always to last
Pferd calls us to run freely, content

Her message clear, advice freely sent
Pferd calls my heart, never to relent
Redeeming the heart and soul forever
With past dreams fufilled, hope ever-present

Of course, the most beautiful word in German will not be a word that loads of people like because of its sound, but it will have to signify a pleasant or somehow funny concept as well. Just to be different, therefore, I ask people to consider the beauty of the word "Pferd", for the sheer oomph of its sound. It has that combination of the plosive with the labio-dental fricative right at the start, which Northern Germans and English speakers alike find so incredibly hard to pronounce.

Oceans apart day after day
And I slowly go insane
I hear your voice on the line
But it doesn't stop the pain

If I see you next to never
How can we say forever

Wherever you go
Whatever you do
I will be right here waiting for you
Whatever it takes
Or how my heart breaks
I will be right here waiting for you

I took for granted, all the times
That I though would last somehow
I hear the laughter, I taste the tears
But I can't get near you now

Oh, can't you see it baby
You've got me goin' CrAzY

Wherever you go
Whatever you do
I will be right here waiting for you
Whatever it takes
Or how my heart breaks
I will be right here waiting for you

I wonder how we can survive
This romance
But in the end if I'm with you
I'll take the chance

Oh, can't you see it baby
You've got me goin' cRaZy

Wherever you go
Whatever you do
I will be right here waiting for you
Whatever it takes
Or how my heart breaks
I will be right here waiting for you


Split infinitive

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A split infinitive is a grammatical construction in the English language where a word or phrase, usually an adverb or adverbial phrase, occurs between the marker to and the bare infinitive (uninflected) form of the verb. The construction is particularly notable because of some controversy (see below) as to whether it is "grammatically correct".

One famous example is from the television series Star Trek: "to boldly go where no man has gone before." Here, the presence of the adverb boldly between the parts of the infinitive, to and go, creates a split infinitive. The construction can often be avoided by placing the intervening words after the verb or before the to marker: "to go boldly where no man has gone before" or "boldly to go where no man has gone before." However, these two rephrasings do not have identical meanings — the former attaches the boldness to the manner of going, while the latter attaches the boldness to the complete act of going "where no man has gone before."

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